4 Common Signs of Enamel Erosion

Posted on July 06, 2018 by Andrew

Your teeth boast exceptional natural protection in the form of enamel. This is a very thin outer layer that covers the part of the tooth that’s visible above the gumline, and it’s the hardest substance created by the human body.

But, hard as it is, enamel can still be eroded by anything from grinding your teeth to drinking too many acidic drinks. When enamel erosion becomes serious, you need to speak to your dentist, so learn about and watch out for these 4 common signs.

  1. Sensitivity

Starting to find that sweet foods or hot or cold temperatures cause a twinge? That means your teeth are becoming more sensitive. There are plenty of reasons why this might be, but enamel erosion is one of the most common.

  1. Discoloration

Enamel only covers the outer layer of your teeth. Beneath is dentin, and you’ll start to expose it as your enamel is eroded. Dentin doesn’t look the same as enamel, so it’s common for teeth to appear yellower once the enamel has started to go. You may also find the edges of your front teeth looking slightly transparent.

  1. Cracks and Chips

Since enamel is responsible for protecting your teeth, it should come as no surprise to learn that enamel erosion often leads to chipped and pitted surfaces. This is usually most evident along the tops of the front teeth, which may become rougher and more irregular as enamel is eroded away.

  1. Pain

The sensitivity created by a loss of enamel can grow worse over time. In the later stages of enamel erosion, you may even find your teeth becoming so sensitive that trying to enjoy sweet, hot, or cold food and drink becomes practically impossible. Instead of enjoying it, you’ll feel a painful jolt in your teeth.

Don’t suffer in silence, if you suspect you may have enamel erosion, speak to your dentist about prevention and treatment.

Tip of the Day

If It Doesn’t Smell, Don’t Wash It

According to Real Simple, if every American made an effort to launder less — cutting out just one load of laundry a week per household — we’d save enough water to fill seven million swimming pools each year.

So if it looks clean, and it smells clean, call it clean and wear it again. Consider hanging worn clothes out on your clothesline to freshen them up between wearings

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